68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Tofukuji
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Tofukuji
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto Kiyomizudera
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto 4 Patterns - 京都あさひ屋-Kyoto Asahiya
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto Heian Jingu Shrine
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto Heian Jingu Shrine
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto Heian Jingu Shrine
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto Heian Jingu Shrine
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto Kinkaku-ji
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto Kinkaku-ji
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Tofukuji
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Tofukuji
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto 4 Patterns - 京都あさひ屋-Kyoto Asahiya
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto 4 Patterns - 京都あさひ屋-Kyoto Asahiya
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto 4 Patterns - 京都あさひ屋-Kyoto Asahiya
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto 4 Patterns - 京都あさひ屋-Kyoto Asahiya
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto 4 Patterns - 京都あさひ屋-Kyoto Asahiya
68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto 4 Patterns - 京都あさひ屋-Kyoto Asahiya

68cm Rayon Furoshiki - Kyoto 4 Patterns

常规价格 $39.00 销售价格 $59.00 单价 单价
结账时计算的运费

# After your order, please note your phone number.
The express shipping document needs write it. thanks.

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Now almost countries shipped by express because recently cannot use Japan Post.


Japanese Traditional Rayon Fabric

Material : Rayon100%
Size : 68cm x 68cm (27×27in)
Pattern : Heian Jingu Shrine, Kiyomizudera, Kinkaku-ji, Tofukuji

Handmade in Kyoto, JAPAN

Heian Jingu Shrine (平安神宮, Heian Jingū) has a relatively short history, dating back just over a hundred years to 1895. The shrine was built on the occasion of the 1100th anniversary of the capital's foundation in Kyoto and is dedicated to the spirits of the first and last emperors who reigned from the city, Emperor Kammu (737-806) and Emperor Komei (1831-1867). Heian is the former name of Kyoto.

Kiyomizudera (清水寺, literally "Pure Water Temple") is one of the most celebrated temples of Japan. It was founded in 780 on the site of the Otowa Waterfall in the wooded hills east of Kyoto, and derives its name from the fall's pure waters. The temple was originally associated with the Hosso sect, one of the oldest schools within Japanese Buddhism, but formed its own Kita Hosso sect in 1965. In 1994, the temple was added to the list of UNESCO world heritage sites.

Kinkaku-ji (金閣寺, literally "Temple of the Golden Pavilion"), officially named Rokuon-ji (鹿苑寺, literally "Deer Garden Temple"), is a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan. It is one of the most popular buildings in Japan, attracting a large number of visitors annually. It is designated as a National Special Historic Site, a National Special Landscape and is one of 17 locations making up the Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto which are World Heritage Sites.

Tofukuji (東福寺, Tōfukuji) is a large Zen temple in southeastern Kyoto that is particularly famous for its spectacular autumn colors. The temple was founded in 1236 at the behest of the powerful Fujiwara clan. Its name is a combination of the names of two great temples in Nara that were also associated with the Fujiwara, Todaiji Temple and Kofukuji Temple. Tofukuji has historically been one of the principal Zen temples in Kyoto, and is a head temple of one of the schools of the Rinzai sect of Zen Buddhism.

In Japan, Wrapping cloths have been a tradition (known as furoshiki).
They are a fabulous, zero waste way of wrapping anything from produce and wine bottles to clothes & gifts.

Furoshiki embraces the philosophy of eco-friendly living by challenging us on how many items we really need. This beautiful and ingenious art allows one object to have many uses simply by folding and tying the cloth in a different way.

While Japanese culture is not alone in using fabric wrapping, furoshiki has a distinctive style reflecting Japanese interest in ceremony, beauty, multi-functional objects and thoughtful detail in approach to everyday living.

Cloth wrapping has been used for over 1200 years in Japan and the word furoshiki came about during the Edo period (1603-1868) when the cloths were commonly used in bath houses to wrap clothes and as a bath mat. The word furoshiki means 'bath spread'.

Over time, Japanese developed a multitude of uses and patterns that are both elegant and functional. One furoshiki cloth can be used for :
wrapping a gift
a bag for shopping
decorating a handbag
a picnic hamper
a tablecloth
household decor
a scarf, belt or bandana
wrapping clothes when travelling

In our store, there are many patterns you can choose, if you have any questions, please feel free to contact me.

※ The color may differ from the actual one depending on the coloration condition of the monitor.


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